Home News Central Highlands Water reflects on reconciliation

Central Highlands Water reflects on reconciliation

The plan is a guide that outlines actions to support reconciliation with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples within the communities in which CHW operates.

A joint Welcome to Country and Smoking Ceremony was performed by Wadawurrung Traditional Owner, Bonnie Chew, and Dja Dja Wurrung Traditional Owner, Rodney Carter, at White Swan Reservoir. The reservoir is in Wadawurrung Country, near the boundary of Dja Dja Wurrung Country.

Managing Director, Paul O’Donohue, said, “We recognise Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples as the First Custodians of the land and water on which we provide essential water and wastewater services for the customers and community in our region.”

“We are committed to reconciliation and to creating cultural connections. A major part of the plan is for all staff to undertake cultural awareness training,” Mr O’Donohue said.

CHW’s vision for reconciliation is to enhance their understanding of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples and to build positive and respectful relationships with local Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities to support healthy living.

Wadawurrung Traditional Owner, Bonnie Chew, said, “A Reconciliation Action Plan provides a framework for organisations to support the national reconciliation movement. Central Highlands Water has written the plan which supports programs to develop respectful and meaningful relationships and opportunities with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples.”

The plan features stunning artwork by Wadawurrung Traditional Owner, Trina Dalton-Oogjes, which illustrates the connection between healthy waterways and a healthy environment.

CHW’s Reflect Reconciliation Action Plan is available online at www.chw.net.au/reconciliationaction-plan

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